Your Own. Personal. Librarian.

5,703 notes

Kurt Vonnegut’s Rules for Short Stories
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things–reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them–in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

Kurt Vonnegut (via chrisarrant)

(via randomhouse)

1 note

Help us out!

molinekids:

THANK YOU!

5,466 notes

molinekids:

diversityinya:

yaflash:

The news just broke… Walter Dean Myers has passed. In his lifetime, he wrote over 100 books, served as the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, won too many awards and honors to list, advised and inspired kids and young writers everywhere, and impacted thousands of lives. He was a lifelong proponent of diversity in children’s literature, and just a few months ago wrote an article that once again sparked the discussion.

Rest well, sir. You will be remembered always.

Beyond this, words fail me.

Not only did we lose a fine writer, but a trailblazler and advocate for more inclusivity and diversity in kidlit. A sad day indeed.

We’re heartbroken over the news.  Go read a one of Myers’ great books right now.

0 notes

Perfect music for a Monday morning, courtesy of Jake Bellows.  Looking forward to his Thursday evening performance here at the library, starting 6:30 p.m.